Archive for the ‘cloud’ Category

If you’re here for my experiments in culinary science move along swiftly, this post isn’t for you. This is all about enterprise architecture versus cloud native architecture. RDBMS is a meatball Enterprises use (or at least have used) Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS), and such things have become deeply embedded into the organisation and culture […]


All three of the major cloud service providers have (or have announced) ‘have your cake and eat it’ versions of their services where data resides on premises whilst stuff is managed from a control plane in the cloud. AWS has Outposts (launched at re:Invent 2018 but still at the ‘sign up to learn more’ stage […]


Cloudflare recently announced two additional capabilities for their “serverless” Workers: support for WebAssembly as an alternative to JavaScript, and a key-value store called Workers KV. WebAssembly will allow Workers to be written in compiled languages such as C, C++, Rust and Go. Workers KV provides an eventually consistent state storage mechanism hosted across Cloudflare’s global […]


This is one of those posts that started life on an email thread. It comes from a discussion on the topic of multi cloud governance for large enterprises. Why cloud? The answer is not ‘cloud is cheaper’, because it just isn’t. We know from Amazon’s financials that it’s gushing money because cloud is a high […]


TL;DR T-Shirt sizes are frequently used to create the VM types and cost structure for private clouds, but if the sizing isn’t informed by data this can lead to stranded resources and inefficient capacity management. It’s the antitheses of dynamic capacity management where every VM is sized according to the resources it actually consumes, ensuring […]


Last night we celebrated the 10th anniversary of CloudCamp London by celebrating the 40th anniversary of the Hitch-Hikers Guide to The Galaxy (HHGTG). It was a lot of fun – probably the best CloudCamp ever. I can’t say that I was there from the beginning, as I sadly missed the first CloudCamp London due to […]


Amazon’s Chris Munns announced at the recent Serverless Conference NYC that AWS Lambda will soon support a feature called traffic shifting. This will allow a weight to be applied to Lambda function aliases to shift traffic between two versions of a function. The feature will enable the use of canary releases and blue/green deployment. Continue reading the full story at InfoQ.


TL;DR VMs on public cloud don’t provide the same level of control over sizing as on premises VMs, and this can have a number of impacts on how capacity is managed. Most importantly ‘T-shirt’ type sizing can provide sub optimal fit of workload to infrastructure, and the ability to over commit CPUs is very much […]


LessOps

09Aug17

JeffConf have posted the video from my talk there on LessOps (or should that be ‘LessOps), which is how I see operations working out in a world of ‘serverless’ cloud service: The full playlist is here, and I’ve also published the slides:


In a footnote to yesterday’s application intimacy post I said: in time there will be services for provisioning, monitoring and logging, and all that will remain of ‘infrastructure’ will be the config of those services; and since we might treat that config as code then ultimately the NoOps ‘just add code – we’ll take care […]