Archive for the ‘technology’ Category

Life with a better Outlook People frequently send me ‘invites’ with attached Internet Calendaring and Scheduling (.ics) files. This is problematic, as I don’t use (fat client) Outlook, and web/mobile Outlook might be able to open those files (sometimes), but can’t do anything useful with them[1]. To make matters worse, it’s pretty common for the […]


Skills development and training is a huge part of driving an organisation forward into the future, and so it’s something that I spend a lot of time and energy on. I’ve seen a bunch of stuff over the past year that leads me to expect a revolution in training. Katacoda I first came across Katacoda at […]


Silent PC

16Jul18

TL;DR I’ve been very happy with the silence of my passively cooled NUC for the past 4 years, but it was starting to perform poorly. So when I came across a good looking recipe for a silent PC with higher performance I put one together for myself. Background I’ve been running my NUC in an […]


#2 of jobs that should exist but don’t in most IT departments (#1 was The Application Portfolio Manager). What’s a constraint? From Wikipedia: The theory of constraints (TOC)[1] is an overall management philosophy introduced by Eliyahu M. Goldratt in his 1984 book titled The Goal It’s the idea that in a manufacturing process there will […]


#1 of jobs that should exist but don’t in most IT departments What should we do about all the legacy stuff? This was a question that came up at the closing panel of the Agile Enterprise Rome conference I was at in May. The context was ‘we’ve spent a couple of days hearing about this […]


Laser Printers

16Jun18

My family prints a lot[1] – about 1200 pages/year, which is why I made the decision almost a decade ago to switch from inkjet to laser. Inkjets weren’t just costing me a fortune in ink; they were also costing me a fortune in printers because they kept clogging up and failing in various ways. I […]


I’m starting to see companies abandon Pivotal Cloud Foundry (PCF) in favour of Kubernetes distributions such as Red Hat’s OpenShift; and it’s almost certainly just a matter of time before we see traffic in the opposite direction. My suspicion is that this is nothing to do with the technology itself[1], but rather that early implementations […]


Background Jess Frazelle has recently been blogging about her Home Lab, which made me realise that over the years I’ve written here about pieces of my own lab, but never the entirety. Network Wired networks are better for bandwidth, reliability and latency, so I use wired whenever I can. Taking a queue from Ian Miell’s […]


RISC-V[1] is something that I’ve been aware of via the Open Source Hardware Users Group (OSHUG) for a little while, and their most recent meeting was a RISC-V special, with talks on core selection and porting FreeBSD to the platform. Suddenly it seems that RISC-V is all over the news. A sample from the last […]


TL;DR Organisations of all types are increasingly making decisions based on data and its analysis, but the rigour involved in this hasn’t yet entered our broader social discourse. I’m hopeful that we all start getting better access to data, and better understanding of the analysis and modelling process so that decisions can be made for […]