Posts Tagged ‘Azure’

Certification

11Oct19

TL;DR Knowing how the cloud works is becoming essential knowledge in the IT industry, and getting certification is a reliable way of ensuring that knowledge is consistent and tested. Background Yesterday this excellent cartoon showed up in Forrest Brazeal’s ‘FaaS and Furious‘ strip, it’s very timely as certification has been a hot topic at work […]


All three of the major cloud service providers have (or have announced) ‘have your cake and eat it’ versions of their services where data resides on premises whilst stuff is managed from a control plane in the cloud. AWS has Outposts (launched at re:Invent 2018 but still at the ‘sign up to learn more’ stage […]


All of the major cloud providers now offer some means by which it’s possible to connect to them directly, meaning not over the Internet. This is generally positioned as helping with the following concerns: Bandwidth – getting a guaranteed chunk of bandwidth to the cloud and applications in it. Latency – having an explicit maximum […]


At last week’s Ignite conference Microsoft announce a set of new networking capabilities for its Azure cloud described as being ‘for a consistent, connected and hybrid cloud’. The new capabilities include improvements to ExpressRoute, Azure’s Internet bypass offering, availability of ExpressRoute for SaaS offerings such as Office 365 and Skype for Business, additional VPN capabilities […]


The cloud price wars that began at the end of March have been all about compute and storage pricing. I don’t recall hearing network pricing being mentioned at all; and indeed there haven’t been any major shifts in network pricing. Photo credit: Datacenter World Network is perhaps now the largest hidden cost of using major IaaS providers, […]


The 90 day free trial of Azure that I started so that I could describe how to build OpenELEC in the cloud is coming to a close. As I sit here once again waiting for my machine to reboot I don’t think I’ll miss it much when it’s gone. I’ve already written about my issues […]


A few weeks back I wrote a howto that utilised the 90 day free trial on Azure to build OpenELEC for the Raspberry Pi. Days later my account was disabled as I’d exhausted the (rather low) limit for I/O within the trial. Since I’d only used 5-6p of extra stuff I went through the process […]


I was very frustrated last month when my trial subscription of Azure IaaS was disabled after a couple of days use (and I’m working on a post detailing how I later resurrected my server). The cause of that issue was that the free trial only bundled 1m IOPS (storage transactions). I’ve been watching my use of […]


After just 2.5 days of my 90 day trial my Azure account has been disabled: I *think* this has happened because I’ve exhausted the (paltry[1]) 20GB bandwidth allocation that comes with the trial, and that this happened because people were downloading OpenELEC builds/images from the web server I stood up in part 2 of my […]


In the first part of this howto I went through signing up for a cloud service, provisioning a VM, installing the build tools and kicking off a build. All being well you should end up with something like this: Azure can also give you a pretty chart of how busy the VM was during the build […]