Posts Tagged ‘tunnel’

I wrote a few days ago about my first failed attempt to do this. After some perseverance, and with some lessons learned along the way I’m pleased to say that I now have it working. Given that VXLAN (at least in the Linux kernel implementation) needs multicast I’m still not sure that this is a […]


This seemed like a good idea, as VXLAN has been in the Linux kernel since 3.7. TL;DR – this doesn’t work as I’d hoped. The two major issues being: VXLAN needs a multicast enabled network, which rules out most public clouds. Instability – I’ve managed to provoke multiple kernel panics on stock Ubuntu 14.04. Background […]


A friend of mine recently returned from working in the US for 3 years, where he’d got to like listening to Internet radio using Pandora. He wanted to get things set up so that he could listen to Pandora on his kitchen stereo. Challenge #1 – be in the US Pandora uses IP geolocation to […]


Sadly it’s fairly typical for corporate web filters to block ‘unusual’ ports, which means that if you’re trying to access a service that’s using anything other than port 80 for HTTP and port 443 for HTTPS then you might be in trouble. I recently came across a situation where somebody was trying to access an […]


In part 1 I went through setting up an SSH tunnel, and waking up machines on the home network. In this part I’ll run through how to use various protocols and clients to connect to machines on the home network. SSH tunnels on PuTTY SSH lets you tunnel many other protocols through it (using a […]


In this post I’m going to cover setting up a network tunnel and waking up other computers on the home network. Why use a Raspberry Pi? A tunnel needs two ends, so at home this means leaving at least one machine switched on – keeping the electricity meter turning. One of the great things about […]


OpenVPN

22Nov11

For some time I’ve used SSH tunnels as a means to pretend that I’m somewhere else to avoid geography filters, or to otherwise sneak past content filters. This is fine for regular HTTP(S) traffic from a browser, where it is easy to define a proxy server, but doesn’t work so well for other applications – […]


Since I started using Amazon EC2 as a web proxy I’ve found that I’m exploiting it pretty regularly. Every time that I see one of those ‘you can’t access that content from your country’ type messages I have a choice. I can give up and move on, or I can fork out 2¢ to spin up […]